By Painted Wolf Foundation - May 1, 2019

Return to the London Natural History Museum

In January 2019, Painted Wolf Foundation trustee, Nick Dyer, alongside Nick Lyon, the producer of the BBC landmark series, Dynasties, made tracks in the Natural History Museum (NHM).

You can watch the full interview HERE.

This April, it was time for Nick to get in front of the camera again for another Nature Live talk in the NHM’s Attenborough Studio. Only this time Nick was interviewed by Cristina Torrente about his Wildlife Photographer of the Year entry, A Head of the Game.

The 200-strong audience included Hugo van der Westhuizen from the Frankfurt Zoological Society. He attended the event alongside rangers from Zambia and Zimbabwe taking part in the London Marathon.

Behind the Lens with Nick Dyer

All of Nick’s photographs are taken on foot in Mana Pools, Zimbabwe, the only walking park in Africa. He has spent the past six years perfecting his skills as a wildlife photographer focusing on his favourite animal, the painted wolf. It’s no secret…painted wolves make an exciting subject matter to photograph because they are so playful.

Watch the Nature Live talk here:

Nick’s initial goal of photographing these fascinating creatures has now expanded to include educating the world about the plight of the painted wolf.

Learn more about the challenges facing the painted wolf.

A Head of the Game

The powerful photograph depicts Blacktip’s puppies playing with a dead baboon head. What is significant about the image is it not only conveys the painted wolf’s deep sense of fun but captures a unique behaviour – baboon predation.

The hunting and killing of baboons by painted wolves has never been recorded in the wild until now.  Certain packs in Mana Pools National Park have developed a taste for these mischievous primates. Usually, it is leopards that prey on baboons. The baboon population in Mana Pools has increased significantly and is having a negative impact on the ecology of the park.  Enter the painted wolves.

Read more about this unique behaviour in Nick’s National Geographic article.